Fall film festival addresses social justice

Coral Avery, News Contributor

Learning about the issues facing the planet both locally and globally is an important part to creating change.

The Wild and Scenic Film Festival on Thursday November 15th covered environmental topics such as preventing the spread of amphibious disease in Oregon, protecting the endangered Rusty Patched Bumblebee and the danger of carbon release from Norway’s melting permafrost. Social struggles were also addressed within these films, including the disparity between white and non-white individuals’ access to outdoor activities, as well as Native Alaskans’ rights to unpolluted First Foods. 

Even their advertisements were for sustainable companies such as Kanteen, which shared that Americans use 1,838 disposable cups every second. It was an event that aspired to inspire viewers to make change locally and globally with the power of community.

“The Wild and Scenic Film Festival is a nationally touring film festival, that we host annually here in Corvallis, with content focused around environmental education and inspiring activism,” said Jennah Stillman, the Communications and Events Coordinator for the Corvallis Environmental Center.

Stillman’s favorite part of working with the Corvallis Environmental Center is being able to interact with so many people, businesses and organizations in the community to communicate the work that we do, helping others to get involved and understand how everyone can help make a difference.

“I enjoy planning events and promoting the array of environmental education work that the Corvallis Environmental Center provides for all ages and walks of life. Seeing the grassroots change that can occur in the community, helping it become a more sustainable place, is really special.”

At the conclusion of the event, Stillman described her passion for the power of people and how change requires a groundswell effort.

“Making the world a better place would not be possible without community,” Stillman said.